Donation of $1 Million for endowment fund for UWC Mostar


UWC (United World Colleges) International and the UWC Mostar Endowment 'Bridge to the Future' are proud to announce that, with the $1 million donation by Shelby Davis, the endowment has achieved funds totalling EUR 7.5 million. As a result, UWC Mostar will now be able to provide between 30 and 40 additional scholarships to students attending the college (read more).
The Davis-UWC Impact Challenge is an extraordinary gift matching initiative launched by philanthropist Shelby Davis, a long time supporter and friend of UWC. With the launch of the Davis-UWC Impact Challenge, Shelby Davis agreed to match at 100% new gifts to the UWC schools and colleges.

UWC Mostar was founded 11 years ago in a region dominated by the aftermath of war and continuing ethnic divisions. UWC Mostar is one of 16 UWC schools and colleges worldwide which are all joined by one shared mission: to make education a force to unite people, nations and cultures for peace and a sustainable future. UWC offers a challenging educational experience to a deliberately diverse group of young people who are selected by UWC’s national committees exclusively on the basis of demonstrated promise and potential and independent of socio-economic means. UWC education places a high value on experiential learning, community service and outdoor activities, which complement high academic standards delivered through the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma.

Today, UWC Mostar stands as a 'lighthouse' model for post-conflict education and reconciliation. UWC Mostar is the only school in the country whose overriding task is to bring Bosniaks, Croats and Serbs under one roof to study and to live together in peace - alongside a student community from 59 different nations with a special emphasis of selecting students from conflict and post-conflict areas.

For many years, budget constraints have compelled UWC Mostar to survive under very difficult circumstances while providing the exceptional education that is expected from a UWC. In 2013, the UWC Mostar Endowment 'Bridge to the Future' was created to find a long-term solution to these financial challenges. This endowment has successfully secured UWC Mostar's future with the creation of a solid financial foundation. The aim now is to increase the endowment to a total of EUR 20 million within the next three years.

For having reached this important first milestone, UWC would like to express its gratitude to those who have played a decisive role in founding and developing UWC Mostar, among them David Sutcliffe, Valentina Mindoljevic, the current Head of UWC Mostar, and Jasminka Bratic, the current Chair of the College Board. Through their passion, commitment, determination and relentless pursuit to ensure the continued existence of the College, they have allowed UWC Mostar to continue to operate over the past years. Many thanks also go to all other donors who have made significant contributions to UWC Mostar Endowment ‘Bridge to The Future’.
Donors
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List of people / organizations / sovereigns that have donated to the Endowment Fund so far:

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More information to follow soon
Alumni
Click here for more information on Alumni scholarship donations.

How to Donate?
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Please contact us when you are interested in donating to the Endowment Fund or are interested in participating in one of the Matching Schemes. We can be reached at ObscureMyEmail or via the form below (click):
Matching Schemes
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Matching Schemes are a good way to allow people to participate in the fundraising efforts of the Endowment without having to pay €200,000.

Please click here for more information.
Currently the Endowment has a Scholarship Endowment Matching Scheme in place. Every euro given to this Scheme will be matched by the Endowment.

So, for example, if you wish to donate €100, then this will be matched with another €100 by the Endowment. In effect, €100,000 needs to be raised by each Scheme.
The following Matching Schemes are in place:
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UWC Mostar Alumni Scholarship Endowment
UWC Mostar is a young College with only 500 alumni and many of them still studying at University. However, UWC Mostar students have learnt how tough life can be and the Endowment is sure that the UWC Mostar Alumni are up to the challenge of this Scheme. Showing gratitude and support will not only help the long-term viability of the College, but will also send a clear message to potential future donors that UWC Mostar Alumni are willing to back the College with their own money.

More corporate Matching Schemes will follow soon.

Currently named scholarships
The Davis Scholarship
More scholarships for UWC students at Mostar and at every other UWC campus are critical to expanding educational opportunities for the world's most promising teenagers.  I hope many others will join in giving generously to UWC Mostar.
Shelby Davis
The United World College Mostar Endowment ‘Bridge to the Future’ is proud to announce the creation of four Davis Scholarships. These scholarships will fund, in perpetuity, four places for talented students from Bosnia and Herzegovina at United Word College (UWC) Mostar. The trustees of the endowment are thrilled with this most generous gift. Being long-term supporters of the UWC movement, Gale and Shelby Davis enabled with this gift even more talented Bosnian students to enjoy world-class education in a multi-ethnic environment. In doing so they made an essential contribution to a more tolerant and peaceful Bosnia and Herzegovina in the years to come.

Commenting on the creation of these scholarships, Shelby Davis stated: “More scholarships for UWC students at Mostar and at every other UWC campus are critical to expanding educational opportunities for the world's most promising teenagers.  I hope many others will join in giving generously to UWC Mostar.

Biography Shelby M.C. Davis
Shelby M.C. Davis was the founder of Davis Advisors, a mutual fund management company with more than $60 billion under management now being run by his son Christopher.
Mr. Davis received his Bachelor of Arts degree from Princeton University in 1958. He majored in American History, was a member of Tiger Inn, and was a reporter for the college newspaper, TheDaily Princetonian.

Mr. Davis began his career with the Bank of New York, where he worked for eight years. He entered the Bank as a Security Analyst and after five years was put in charge of Equity Research and named its youngest Vice President since Alexander Hamilton.

Since retiring from running Davis Advisors, Mr. Davis has become a major philanthropist. With veteran international educator Phil Geier, Mr. Davis founded the Davis United World College Scholars Program in the year 2000. The program has since grown to become the world's largest international scholarship program for undergraduates in the world. Davis philanthropy is currently contributing over $45 million annually to this cause, which to date has supported over 7,600 scholars on over 94 American college and university campuses.
Mr. Davis is an honorary trustee of the U.S. Ski & Snowboard Association and International Patron of the United World College movement. He has served on the boards of Princeton University, United World College-USA, the Hoover Institution and the Teton Science School. He has been widely recognized for his philanthropy and awarded numerous honorary degrees.

Mr. Davis is married to Gale Lansing Davis and has six children, three with Gale and three from a previous marriage. Mr. and Mrs. Davis reside in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. He has a total of eight grandchildren.
The Eijk and Rose-Marie van Otterloo Scholarship
We are grateful that our children had, and our grandchildren will have the opportunity to attend the schools of their choice. With our gift to UWC Mostar we wish to give deserving students the chance to attend a world-class school and hope they will become the global citizens they strive to be.
Eijk and Rose-Marie van Otterloo
The United World College Mostar Endowment ‘Bridge to the Future’ is proud to announce the Eijk and Rose-Marie van Otterloo Scholarship. This scholarship will finance a place for a bright young student from Bosnia and Herzegovina at the United World College (UWC) Mostar in perpetuity. The trustees of the endowment are thrilled to announce this highly generous donation by Eijk and Rose-Marie van Otterloo, which is exemplary for their commitment to philanthropic causes of all kinds, ranging from art to development, and from healthcare to education. Partly thanks to their support, the ‘Bridge to the Future’ endowment fund is able to greatly contribute to UWC Mostar’s long-term financial stability, allowing the college to bridge ethnic divides in the Balkan region for the years and decades to come.

Commenting on the creation of the Scholarship, Eijk and Rose-Marie van Otterloo said: “We are grateful that our children had, and our grandchildren will have the opportunity to attend the schools of their choice. With our gift to UWC Mostar we wish to give deserving students the chance to attend a world-class school and hope they will become the global citizens they strive to be.

Biography Eijk and Rose-Marie van Otterloo
Both being born in the ‘low countries’, Eijk in the Netherlands and Rose-Marie in Belgium, Rose-Marie and Eijk van Otterloo met when they were working in the United States. Here they consequently settled, with Eijk co-founding Grantham, Mayo, Van Otterloo & Company (GMO), an investment management firm, in 1977. Having lived in the United States ever since, their connection with Europe did not disappear. They became avid art-collectors, assembling, over the course of 30 years, one of the finest private collections of 17th-century Dutch and Flemish art in the world.

Since the start Rose-Marie and Eijk have combined their love for art with a pronounced philanthropic spirit. They frequently allow their collection to be displayed around the world and made donations to, amongst others, the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. Having also supported local, educational and health charities, Rose-Marie and Eijk have continuously displayed a strong commitment to the public good. This is further shown by their involvement in Chemonics International, which works to alleviate poverty in the developing world through agricultural, educational, and health projects. Rose-Marie served 10 years on its board and in 2006, Eijk and Rose-Marie became its major shareholder, leading the company’s efforts to become fully employee-owned.

Eijk and Rose-Marie van Otterloo live in Boston and have four children.
The Mountbatten Scholarship
That extraordinary young men and women will attend UWC Mostar in his memory is, we believe, just the way he would like to be remembered. Thank you to each and every person who has made this scholarship possible. We send our thanks, support and warmest wishes.
Mountbatten family
The United World College Mostar Endowment ‘Bridge to the Future’ is proud to announce the creation of the Lord Mountbatten Scholarship. This scholarship will, in perpetuity, fund one student from Bosnia and Herzegovina at the United World College (UWC) in Mostar. With this scholarship the Trustees of the endowment are honoured to commemorate Lord Mountbatten’s efforts to create a more peaceful world. Lord Mountbatten was convinced that only by coming together as a global community, a process in which youth has a special role to play, can we promote a peaceful and prosperous future for humankind. This led him to be a staunch supporter of the UWC movement, of which he became the first International President.

Commenting on the creation of the scholarship, the family of Lord Mountbatten has stated: “That extraordinary young men and women will attend UWC Mostar in his memory is, we believe, just the way he would like to be remembered. Thank you to each and every person who has made this scholarship possible. We send our thanks, support and warmest wishes.”

In addition, Michael-John Knatchbull, Chairman of the Trustees of the Mountbatten Memorial Trust, has written: “On behalf of the trustees of the Mountbatten Memorial Trust I would like to endorse the new United World College student scholarship initiative so generously funded by the endowment trustees of the United World College in Mostar and to be named after Lord Mountbatten. 

We feel the importance of any educational opportunity to help foster better understanding between nations, cultures and religions has grown to be more and more crucial in addressing the challenges we face in the modern world. The primary aim of the United World College movement was founded on this principle.


Biography of Lord Mountbatten
Born in 1900 as Prince Louis Francis Albert Victor Nicholas of Battenberg, Lord Mountbatten was raised at his family home in Germany as well as in the royal setting of Windsor, Berkshire. At age 12 he joined the Royal Navy where he was sent to sea as a midshipman during the First World War. Having studied at Christ’s College, Cambridge and the Royal Naval College, Greenwich, Mountbatten became Personal Naval Aide-de-Camp to the then Prince of Wales, who later became King Edward VIII. During the Second World War, Lord Mountbatten was known for his innovative and ground-breaking strategic thinking and became the Supreme Allied Commander in South East Asia.

Following the end of the War, the British Prime Minister Clement Attlee appointed Lord Mountbatten Viceroy of India, entrusting him with the task of overseeing the transition to an independent India. In the bitterly complex situation arising from the hostility between the country’s Muslim and Hindu populations, Mountbatten guided the two countries, India and Pakistan, to independence. Following a 10-month period as the first Governor General of newly independent India, Mountbatten returned to Britain in 1948. He then spent another 17 years in the Royal Navy, completing his service as Chief of the Defence Staff.

The United World Colleges then became Lord Mountbatten's most passionate interest. UWC’s principles combined perfectly two of his strongest convictions - international understanding as the bedrock of peace, peace as the bedrock of prosperity, and the responsibility of his generation to prepare the youth for the future, intellectually, physically, emotionally and morally. As such UWC, with its broad educational philosophy and international outlook, closely matched his view of the world.

As President, Lord Mountbatten took vigorous steps to put UWC on the world’s stage. He created the International Council, played a key role in setting up numerous National Committees, and pressed for bold expansion with new colleges. Both UWC Lester B. Pearson College in Canada and the UWC South East Asia in Singapore were opened during his presidency. After HRH The Prince of Wales agreed to succeed him, he stepped aside on 1 January 1978 to become UWC’s first International Life Patron. A little over a year later, in August 1979, he was assassinated by the IRA whilst on holiday in Ireland.
The Meijs - de Mol van Otterloo Scholarship
We passionately stand behind the UWC philosophy to unite people, nations and cultures for peace and a sustainable future. Even 50 years since its creation, The UWC movement continues to be relevant each and every day. UWC Mostar embodies both the mission and the relevance of UWC to the fullest extent due to its location in a post-conflict region that still suffers from segregation in its communities. The endowment 'Bridge to the Future' funds scholarships for students from across the world whilst allowing UWC Mostar to plan for its future. For us, sponsoring an endowed scholarship is one of the most rewarding accomplishments in our lives.
Fleur Meijs and Adriaan de Mol van Otterloo
The United World College Mostar Endowment ‘Bridge to the Future’ is thrilled to announce the creation of the Meijs – de Mol van Otterloo Scholarship. This scholarship will, each and every year, fund the presence of one talented student from Bosnia and Herzegovina at the United World College (UWC) in Mostar. The creation of this scholarship is an extremely well deserved recognition of the hard work Adriaan de Mol van Otterloo and Fleur Meijs have put into the College. Their support to the College’s leadership, their financial contributions, and their determination to create a solid financial base for UWC Mostar have been indispensable to the College’s sustained success.

Commenting on the creation of the Meijs – de Mol van Otterloo Scholarship, Fleur and Adriaan stated: “We passionately stand behind the UWC philosophy to unite people, nations and cultures for peace and a sustainable future. Even 50 years since its creation, The UWC movement continues to be relevant each and every day. UWC Mostar embodies both the mission and the relevance of UWC to the fullest extent due to its location in a post-conflict region that still suffers from segregation in its communities. The endowment 'Bridge to the Future' funds scholarships for students from across the world whilst allowing UWC Mostar to plan for its future. For us, sponsoring an endowed scholarship is one of the most rewarding accomplishments in our lives”.

Fleur added: “I strongly believe that education is one of the most important tools that we can give to people, not only to develop individually but also to contribute to their societies. This became even more evident to me when I worked for the development organisation Plan International in West Africa. Therefore, I cannot think of a more worthwhile cause where both education and these moral values come together. My drive for my career has been to make the most out of the opportunities given to me. Now it is the time to create opportunities for others by providing them a top-class education through the endowment who would otherwise not had this chance”.

Adding to the above, Adriaan said: “UWC Mostar is one of the most exciting projects that I have come across in my life. The College is located in a region with a troubled history. Mostar is a beautiful town positioned along the river Neretva and between the hills. However, the ethnic division between the Croats and Bosniaks is still visible every day. UWC Mostar is at the forefront of making the world a better place. The students receive excellent education and based on my own experience as an UWC alumnus, I know the life-changing experience Mostar will provide to its students by shaping them to become better world citizens”.

Biography Adriaan de Mol van Otterloo and Fleur Meijs
Adriaan became involved with UWC when he went to UWC Adriatic as a 16 year old student. Following his studies in Milan, Rotterdam and London, he started his career at Schroders Investment Management in London. In 2006 Adriaan founded his own investment management firm, Intrinsic Value Investors (IVI) LLP. In 2009 David Sutcliffe, former Headmaster at UWC Adriatic, asked Adriaan to join the Board of UWC Mostar with the aim to focus on the finances. In order to solve the long-term financial stability of UWC Mostar, the endowment 'Bridge to the Future' was established. Adriaan has also been Trustee of Friends of the Tate Gallery and Trustee of Amera, a refugee charity active in Egypt.

Fleur studied at Erasmus University in the Netherlands and started to work at PwC in London in 1996. She was a partner in the financial services sector in audit and advisory projects. After 20 years, she retired from PwC to spend more time in developing and growing the endowment 'Bridge to the Future'. Fleur has also worked in West Africa for Plan International and she was a member of the Dutch Independent Parliamentary Committee regarding the future structure of the Dutch banking sector. Fleur is a Trustee of the Friends of the British Museum.

Fleur and Adriaan live in London and have three children, Willem, Frederik and Rose.
The Anne Frank Scholarship
The Anne Frank House is honoured to have a scholarship at UWC Mostar endowed in Anne Frank’s name. UWC’s mission of equipping the next generation with the knowledge, skills, leadership qualities and international values, necessary to bridge divisions is laudable. Certainly, education is the key. Reflecting on the life and thoughts of Anne Frank makes us realise what human beings are capable of in a negative sense. But it also makes us aware, as well, of the positive forces in ourselves and our society. She appeals strongly to our ability to work for and keep believing in a world where human rights and democracy prevail. Most important however when remembering Anne Frank, is that she inspires us to reflect on the world we ourselves are living in.
Ronald Leopold, executive director of the Anne Frank House
The United World College Mostar Endowment ‘Bridge to the Future’ is proud to announce the creation of the Anne Frank Scholarship. This scholarship will fund, in perpetuity, a place for a talented student at the United World College (UWC) Mostar. The trustees of the endowment are honoured to endow this scholarship in Anne Frank’s name. With her diary, Anne Frank wrote a story of universal relevance, demonstrating the importance of tolerance, personal responsibility and respect. By bringing together the Balkan’s various ethnic and religious groups and through a wide-ranging community outreach programme, UWC Mostar seeks to instil these same values in its students. The trustees hope that Anne Frank continues to inspire young people, especially in Mostar and the rest of the Balkan region, with her strength and sense of idealism. In the words of Anne Frank: ‘I’ll make my voice heard, I’ll go out into the world and work for mankind!

In a reaction to the creation of the scholarship, Ronald Leopold, executive director of the Anne Frank House, said:
The Anne Frank House is honoured to have a scholarship at UWC Mostar endowed in Anne Frank’s name. UWC’s mission of equipping the next generation with the knowledge, skills, leadership qualities and international values, necessary to bridge divisions is laudable. Certainly, education is the key.

Reflecting on the life and thoughts of Anne Frank makes us realise what human beings are capable of in a negative sense. But it also makes us aware, as well, of the positive forces in ourselves and our society. She appeals strongly to our ability to work for and keep believing in a world where human rights and democracy prevail. Most important however when remembering Anne Frank, is that she inspires us to reflect on the world we ourselves are living in.

The Anne Frank House develops educational programmes and products based on Anne Frank’s life story, with the aim of raising young people’s awareness of the dangers of anti-Semitism, racism and discrimination and the importance of freedom, equal rights and democracy. The same beliefs that are held high by UWC Mostar. The Anne Frank House wants to encourage young people to take responsibility for the social environment in which they live. In this context we ask ourselves the question ‘who inspires, influences and truly reaches young people?’. Our experience is that this is chiefly young people themselves, and so through peer education we also give them the opportunity to play an active role in carrying out our educational activities, in ways such as giving guided tours of Anne Frank exhibitions and participating in youth conferences and seminars. We don’t supply ready-made answers, but we do offer guidance.

This prominent position for young people is nothing new. In his role as an educator, Otto Frank too called on young people to ask themselves questions, and the starting point for this was and is the identification with Anne Frank that is felt around the world. Although the life of a 15-year-old now and that of Anne Frank in 1944 are very different, they share the dream of equal rights for all, of an open and free society, of being able to be yourself. It is in these ideals that Anne Frank, Martin Luther King, a teenage girl from the favelas of Rio de Janeiro and an adolescent in Bosnia find each other.

The Anne Frank House and UWC Mostar both believe in the power of education. It is our sincere hope that this scholarship will help bridge and connect students, regardless of race, political beliefs and religion, to foster freedom and equal rights and to instil the values of democracy.


Biography of Anne Frank
Anne Frank was a Jewish girl who went into hiding during the Second World War to escape from the Nazis. Aged thirteen she took, together with her father Otto, her mother Edith, her sister Margot and four other people, refuge in a hidden annexe of her father’s business premises. During her time in hiding Anne wrote a diary, and developed into a talented writer. The eight people in the ‘secret annexe’ hid away for 671 days, helped by Otto’s office staff. Then they were betrayed, and deported to concentration camps. Anne Frank died in the Bergen-Belsen camp, shortly before it was liberated. She was fifteen. Otto Frank was the only one of the people in hiding to survive the Holocaust, and he returned to Amsterdam. He arranged for the diary of Anne Frank to be published as a book, which became a source of inspiration to people all over the world.
To find out more about the life of Anne Frank, click here.

The Anne Frank House
Through the efforts of Otto Frank and a group of dedicated benefactors, on 3 May 1957 the Anne Frank House was set up as a charitable foundation: an independent, non-profit organisation dedicated to the preservation and opening to the public of Anne Frank’s hiding place, and to bringing the life story of Anne Frank to the attention of as many people as possible worldwide.

The Anne Frank House also develops educational programmes and products based on Anne Frank’s life, with the aim of raising young people’s awareness of the dangers of anti-Semitism, racism and discrimination and the importance of freedom, equal rights and democracy.
The Jasminka Bratić Scholarship
The United World College in Mostar offers Mostar and its citizen a positive energy and mutual understanding. Through the College, common interests of the people of Bosnia and Herzegovina are discovered and prejudices overcome. At the same time the College’s emphasis on the respecting of each other’s differences and the being open to other cultures, creates a readiness for life in harmony and compromise. As such, I am absolutely honoured to have this scholarship endowed in my name and see my affinity to the College maintained in perpetuity.
Jasminka Bratić
The United World College Mostar Endowment ‘Bridge to the Future’ proudly presents the Jasminka Bratić Scholarship. This scholarship will, in perpetuity, fund a talented student from Bosnia and Herzegovina at the United World College (UWC) in Mostar. With this scholarship, the Trustees of the endowment pay tribute to one of the College’s earliest supporters. Ms Bratić’s hard work, inspirational attitude and her authority within Mostar, provided the College with the much-needed impetus to establish itself as a respected institution. Ms Bratić continuous efforts as the Chair of the Board of UWC Mostar are extremely valuable to the College and deserve the utmost respect.

In response to the creation of the Scholarship, Ms Bratić commented: “The United World College in Mostar offers Mostar and its citizen a positive energy and mutual understanding. Through the College, common interests of the people of Bosnia and Herzegovina are discovered and prejudices overcome. At the same time the College’s emphasis on the respecting of each other’s differences and the being open to other cultures, creates a readiness for life in harmony and compromise. As such, I am absolutely honoured to have this scholarship endowed in my name and see my affinity to the College maintained in perpetuity.

Biography Jasminka Bratić
Jasminka Bratić was born on 26 June 1956 in Mostar. Here she attended the old Mostar Gymnasium "Aleksa Santic”, which is located in the same building which currently hosts the UWC in Mostar. After high school she studied law at Mostar University.

During the Bosnian war Jasminka Bratić and her family were forced to leave Mostar and spend four years in Germany as refugees. Although many refugee families decided not to return to Bosnia and Herzegovina after the war, they came back to Mostar in 1997. Living conditions were difficult in the war-torn and ethnically divided city and the educational system, separating children based on their ethnicity, put the prospects for reconciliation almost beyond reach. All these factors were a grave threat to the future of new generations in Mostar.

Upon return, Ms Bratić worked at the University of Mostar as Secretary of the Faculty of Economic Studies and as Head of Student Services, a role in which she was closely in touch with Mostar’s youth. She was also a member of the Assembly of the Herzegovina-Neretva Canton, Chair of the Fund for the Allocation of Student Loans in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, a member of the Regional Council Congress of Bosniak Intellectuals, and the Assistant to the Minister of Justice of the Herzegovina-Neretva Canton. Ms Bratić also founded the association of citizens "Mujaga Komadina" which implements projects in the local community with the aim of integrating Mostar’s divided communities.
When asked to become Chair of the Board of the Mostar Gymnasium, her former high school, she immediately accepted. By hosting, although in separate classes, children from all ethnic groups, this school was making a first step in contributing to the normalization of human relations in the city where the effects of war and division were still felt.

In her role as Chair of the Mostar Gymnasium, Ms Bratić met with the initiators of UWC Mostar. She was immediately convinced that this project could make a major contribution to life in Mostar and became involved in the establishment of the College. Ms Bratić considers the ideas of the UWC movement as identical to her own and sees UWC Mostar as an umbrella under which the rebuilding of the war-torn society of Bosnia and Herzegovina as well as its educational system can begin.

When the College was founded, Ms Bratić became a member of the Executive Committee of the UWC-IB initiative in Bosnia and Herzegovina. After the revision of the legal structure of the College in 2009, a process in which she played a key role, Ms Bratić became Chair of the Board of UWC Mostar. In this role Ms Bratić is actively involved in the daily life and work of the College, collaborating closely with its small management team. Through her activities, Ms Bratić became a friend and tutor to many staff members of UWC Mostar. Ms Bratić is also a Deputy Chair of the Board of the Foundation "Education in Action", which is the formal legal founder of the College. Through her work with the College, Ms Bratić has the goal of using education as a tool to form a new generation of young people, who will be the initiators in creating universal values for societies around the world. This is the necessary first step to establish long lasting peace, fight poverty and develop the Bosnian economy.
The Kurt Hahn Scholarship
My uncle Kurt was electrified by his 1954 visit to the NATO Defence College in Paris. Here, new loyalties were being implanted in the minds and hearts of former enemies. From this, the inspiration for UWC was born. He would rejoice, as our family does, to know that his name and inspiration are now commemorated in perpetuity in the College in Mostar which so faithfully reflects his highest ideals.
Betina Hahn

The United World College Mostar Endowment ‘Bridge to the Future’ proudly announces the Kurt Hahn Scholarship. This scholarship will, in perpetuity, fund a place for a talented student from Bosnia and Herzegovina at the United World College (UWC) in Mostar. The trustees of the endowment are honoured to endow a scholarship in the name of the educational visionary and UWC’s founding father Kurt Hahn. In Hahn’s vision to create peace and understanding through international education lies the inspiration for UWC. Hahn also created many other international schools, foremost among them Salem in Germany and Gordonstoun in Scotland.

Commenting on the creation of the scholarship, Benita Hahn, the niece of Kurt Hahn, stated: “My uncle Kurt was electrified by his 1954 visit to the NATO Defence College in Paris. Here, new loyalties were being implanted in the minds and hearts of former enemies. From this, the inspiration for UWC was born. He would rejoice, as our family does, to know that his name and inspiration are now commemorated in perpetuity in the College in Mostar which so faithfully reflects his highest ideals.”

Bernd J. Westermeyer, Headmaster of Salem, added: “In 1920 Kurt Hahn and Prince Max von Baden founded Schule Schloss Salem in a baroque castle which for hundreds of years had been a Cistercian monastery. It is no coincidence that only two years after the appalling experience of World War I Kurt Hahn's first school took on the same name as the castle and the previous monastic community: Salem, which is derived from the Arabic word "salām" / "peace". To give a Kurt Hahn Scholarship to a promising young UWC student living and learning in Mostar, a city that suffered so much from war in the 1990s, is a very strong signal of hope: Hope that young well- educated women and men will be able to create and to preserve peace in the powerful spirit of responsibility that Dr. Kurt Hahn intended to spread all around the world.”
Peter Carpenter, a former pupil of Kurt Hahn, said: “As the Founder of the Cambridge University Kurt Hahn Trust, which awards Kurt Hahn Scholarships to German and British post-graduate students, I strongly support any endeavour which pays tribute to this remarkable man. He, more than anyone else I know of, has made an impact on the educational scene worldwide and deserves to be better known. I therefore welcome the news that the Trustees of the Mostar Endowment have set up a scholarship which will bear the name of Kurt Hahn, and wish it well.”

Simon Reid, Principal of the Gordonstoun school, completed: "Mahatma Gandhi was wary of knowledge without character, and I believe he had in mind something similar to Kurt Hahn when the German educationalist founded two schools, first Salem then Gordonstoun, on the founding stones of encouraging international understanding, community service, individual initiative and challenge. These stones are shared with The United World Colleges and it is a privilege to be associated closely with them through this scholarship programme. I greet with real excitement the prospect of generations of UWC Mostar Kurt Hahn scholars having a little, perhaps a lot, of the discernment possessed by the man whose name is given to their scholarship."

The Kurt Hahn Scholarship has been funded by the members of the Investment Committee of ‘Bridge to the Future’.

Biography of Kurt Hahn
Kurt Hahn was born in 1886 in Germany to Jewish parents. Having completed the Gymnasium in Berlin, Hahn continued his studies in Göttingen, Freiburg, Heidelberg and Oxford. Just before the outbreak of the First World War, he returned to Germany where, not enlisted for health reasons, he was enrolled to work in the Foreign Services to read the foreign press. In 1917 disagreement with his leadership over Germany’s wartime strategy led to Hahn’s dismissal.

In January 1919, Hahn became Private Secretary to Prince Max of Baden. In this role he prepared the historical material for Prince Max’s memoirs and, in 1920, founded with Prince Max the ‘Salem School’ in Baden. From 1920 to 1933, coinciding with the rise of Hitler, Hahn was the school’s first headmaster. Following the killing of a communist by supporters of Hitler in 1932, Hahn began fiercely criticizing the regime, challenging his pupils, faculty and alumni to make a choice between National Socialism and Salem. On 11th March 1933 Hahn was arrested and detained by the Nazi regime. Following interventions by, among others, British Prime Minister Ramsay MacDonald, he was released 5 days later and left for Britain in July.

Strongly encouraged by influential British friends, Hahn opened a small school in Scotland that autumn which led in September 1934 to the founding of Gordonstoun. Determined to promote active and courageous citizenship, he founded Outward Bound and the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award Scheme. Ten years after the Second World War, Hahn joined forces with Sir Lawrance Darvall and Desmond Hoare to plan the Atlantic College which, following the donation of St. Donat’s Castle in Wales by Antonin Besse, opened in 1962.

Hahn died in 1974, his legacy by now well established. Four United World Colleges were already running, other schools loyal to his principles were flourishing, and Outward Bound and the Award Scheme were expanding dramatically worldwide. His belief that a bond between all nations and cultures can be established through an education underpinned by active service, physical and artistic activities, continues to be a source of inspiration to many around the globe.
The Elisabeth Rehn Scholarship
Since 1995 I have been strongly linked to the states of the Former Yugoslavia, starting from my appointment as the UN Special Rapporteur on Human Rights. From 1998 my focus became even more on Bosnia and Herzegovina when the UN Secretary General called on me to become his Special Representative for the UN mission in Bosnia and Herzegovina (UNMiBH). Even though rebuilding the country started slowly, much has been achieved. The trauma of the war, however, will remain for many years. Particularly unfortunate is that the Dayton agreement has not helped the country create an education which supports stability by overcoming hostility amongst youth. This is why, when I was asked in 2006 to help found the United World College in Mostar, I did not hesitate for a single moment. Devoted work by the teachers and the Board has created a college which brings together young people from not only the region, but from all over the world. It has been heartbreaking to watch how these young people become best friends regardless of political tensions between their home countries. This is real peace work, so badly needed in the world of today. Education is increasingly seen as the highest of needs when solving conflicts. It is therefore no surprise that the BiH leadership often mentioned to me that UWC in Mostar is “the light at the end of the tunnel”.
Elisabeth Rehn

The United World College Mostar Endowment ‘Bridge to the Future’ is proud to announce the Elisabeth Rehn Scholarship. This scholarship will, in perpetuity, fund a place at United World College (UWC) Mostar for either a Bosnian student or a student with Swedish heritage living in Finland. The trustees of the endowment are highly pleased to present this scholarship to Ms Rehn, honouring a strong advocate for human rights in the Balkans and one of the College’s earliest supporters. As Special Representative of the UN Secretary General to Bosnia and Herzegovina, Rehn encountered Bosnia’s ethnic divides. This encouraged her to play a key-role in setting up UWC Mostar, being the chair of its original governing body.

Commenting on the creating of this scholarship, Rehn stated:

“Since 1995 I have been strongly linked to the states of the Former Yugoslavia, starting from my appointment as the UN Special Rapporteur on Human Rights. From 1998 my focus became even more on Bosnia and Herzegovina when the UN Secretary General called on me to become his Special Representative for the UN mission in Bosnia and Herzegovina (UNMiBH).

Even though rebuilding the country started slowly, much has been achieved. The trauma of the war, however, will remain for many years. Particularly unfortunate is that the Dayton agreement has not helped the country create an education which supports stability by overcoming hostility amongst youth.

This is why, when I was asked in 2006 to help found the United World College in Mostar, I did not hesitate for a single moment. Devoted work by the teachers and the Board has created a college which brings together young people from not only the region, but from all over the world. It has been heartbreaking to watch how these young people become best friends regardless of political tensions between their home countries. This is real peace work, so badly needed in the world of today. Education is increasingly seen as the highest of needs when solving conflicts. It is therefore no surprise that the BiH leadership often mentioned to me that UWC in Mostar is “the light at the end of the tunnel”.

On my 80th birthday I was informed of the efforts to raise a scholarship in my name for the “Bridge to the Future” Endowment fund. I am proud and honoured to give my name to this scholarship and am very grateful to the donors.”


Biography of Elisabeth Rehn
Elisabeth Rehn has had a long political career, ranging from 1979 to 2000. In Finland she served as member of the Parliament, minister of Defense and minister of Equality Affairs. She was also a Finnish presidential candidate and member of the European Parliament. She always combined her political work with the protection of human rights, first as vice chair of the Finnish Red Cross (1984 to 1988) and later as chair of the Finnish UNICEF committee (1988 to 1993).

Rehn has long played an active role in South-Eastern Europe (SEE). She became UN Special Rapporteur on the Situation of Human Rights in Croatia, Serbia and Montenegro, Bosnia and Herzegovina and FYROM in September 1995. In January 1998 she became UN Under Secretary General, Special Representative to Bosnia and Herzegovina. She was furthermore Chair of the Working Table on Democracy and Human Rights of the Stability Pact for SEE from 2003 to 2005.
In addition to stability in the Balkans, Elisabeth Rehn campaigns for the rights of women in conflict. She co-wrote the UN report “Women War Peace” and is a member of numerous advisory boards for implementation of UN resolution 1325 protecting the rights of women in conflict, e.g. the Regional Women’s Lobby SEE. She is also member and former chair of the Board of Directors for the Trust Fund for Victims of the International Criminal Court in The Hague and is senior Gender Advisor for West Africa at the Crisis Management Initiative in Finland.

Elisabeth Rehn has a number of national and international honors and awards, including Econ.Dr h.c. , Pol.Dr h.c. and recently Dr.h.c. in Military sciences from Universities in Finland.

In 2005 the President of the Republic of Finland awarded her with the title of Minister of State.
The Yitzhak Rabin Scholarship
The Yitzhak Rabin Centre in Israel and the Rabin Family are honoured and excited to have a scholarship at UWC Mostar endowed in Yitzhak Rabin’s name. UWC’s mission of equipping the next generation with the knowledge, skills, leadership qualities and international values, necessary to bridge divisions is laudable. Certainly, education is the key which promotes understanding. My father, Prime Minister and Minister of Defence Yitzhak Rabin, dedicated his life to public service because he believed that if every person was equipped with the tools necessary to excel, we could create a thriving Jewish, democratic state in the land of Israel. In addition to my father’s military and political legacy, he left an inheritance of social transformation in the fields of education, healthcare and national infrastructure as he persevered to equalize educational opportunity, reinforce the socio-economic and geographic periphery of the country and strengthen minorities.
Dalia Rabin - Yitzhak Rabin’s daughter and Chair of the Yitzhak Rabin Centre

The United World College Mostar Endowment ‘Bridge to the Future’ is proud to announce the ‘Yitzhak Rabin Scholarship’. This scholarship will provide one place each year for alternately an Israeli and a Palestinian student at United World College (UWC) Mostar. The presence of a Yitzhak Rabin Scholar in the ethnically divided city of Mostar shows that Rabin’s mission of promoting peace amongst people from different cultures has not been forgotten. The trustees of the endowment are proud to honour such a great man and hope that Rabin’s courage and determination will inspire many to bridge national, cultural and religious divides.

Commenting on the creation of the scholarship, Dalia Rabin, Yitzhak Rabin’s daughter and Chair of the Yitzhak Rabin Centre states: “The Yitzhak Rabin Centre in Israel and the Rabin Family are honoured and excited to have a scholarship at UWC Mostar endowed in Yitzhak Rabin’s name. UWC’s mission of equipping the next generation with the knowledge, skills, leadership qualities and international values, necessary to bridge divisions is laudable. Certainly, education is the key which promotes understanding.

My father, Prime Minister and Minister of Defence Yitzhak Rabin, dedicated his life to public service because he believed that if every person was equipped with the tools necessary to excel, we could create a thriving Jewish, democratic state in the land of Israel. In addition to my father’s military and political legacy, he left an inheritance of social transformation in the fields of education, healthcare and national infrastructure as he persevered to equalize educational opportunity, reinforce the socio-economic and geographic periphery of the country and strengthen minorities.

The Yitzhak Rabin Center is the national institute dedicated to his memory and it serves as an education center and museum devoted to his legacy. Now more than ever, it is clear that healing the rifts in Israeli society and working to promote and protect the values of democracy, responsible leadership and peace are as relevant as they were the night of his assassination, November 4, 1995. Our experiential educational and outreach programs for soldiers and students strengthen civil society and reach out to the next generation of leaders. Like my father, the Center transcends differences between right/left, religious/secular and reflects the complexity of Israeli society.

The Yitzhak Rabin Centre and UWC Mostar share a symbiotic mission steeped in the tradition of advocating equality and social change. Both of us are doing our part. Over the past decade, we have been working with students and educators to empower individuals and communities, to promote tolerance and understanding, to instil the values of democracy and to nurture leadership so our younger generations have the knowledge and the tools to face the challenges that lay ahead.
Your generosity ensures that my father’s life’s work will continue to impact Israel and the region for generations to come. It is my sincere hope that this scholarship will help bridge and connect students regardless of race and religion.”


Biography of Yitzhak Rabin
Yitzhak Rabin was born in Jerusalem on March 1, 1922. He joined the Haganah (the Jewish self-defence organisation) at an early age and became, in 1941, one of the first recruits in its elite fighting force, the Palmach. Having fought in both the Second World War and the War for Independence, Rabin continued his service in the Israel Defence Forces. Here Rabin first headed the Northern Command, then became chief of the Operations Branch and then deputy chief of staff. In 1964 Rabin took over as chief of staff. In this role Rabin led Israel to victory during the Six-Day War of June 1967.

Leaving the military in 1968, Rabin was appointed ambassador to the United States. Upon his return he joined the labour party and became, on June 3, 1974, prime minister of Israel. As PM, Rabin entered negotiations with Syria, Jordan, Morocco and Egypt. Rabin’s decision to withdraw from strategic positions in Sinai started the process leading to the Camp David Accords.

In 1984, after seven years in the opposition, Rabin became Israel’s minister of defence. The 1987 Intifada, combined with Jordan giving up its sovereignty over the West Bank, necessitated direct negotiations with the Palestinians. With this in mind, Shimon Peres and Rabin started a new peace process. Upon returning to the office of PM in 1992, Rabin continued to prioritise peace efforts. Although top-secret negotiations between Israel and the Palestinians in Washington failed, further negotiations resulted, on August 20, 1993, in the signing of the Oslo Accords.

On December 10, 1994, Yitzhak Rabin, Shimon Peres and Yasser Arafat were awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for their efforts to create peace in the Middle East. The peace process continued with the signing of the Oslo-B Agreement on September 28, 1995. However, in a dramatic turn of events, Rabin’s contribution to a peaceful Middle East came to a sudden end when, on November 4, 1995, at the close of a peace rally at Kings of Israel Square in Tel Aviv, Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin was assassinated by gunshot by a young Jewish student.
The Captain Mbaye Diagne Scholarship
I am very honoured and proud at the creation of a scholarship in the name of my late husband. This must open our eyes and show us the way towards solidarity and towards love for our fellow human beings, for our country and our planet as the way to achieve any success. May the Lord assist us in all these endeavours and may the door of happiness be open to all of us. Such a great honour really touches our hearts as members of Captain Mbaye Diagne’s family: this is why our children and I are very grateful to the UWC; and indeed, the decision of the Mostar Endowment is a reason of pride for the Senegalese.
Yacine Diagne - Widow of Captain Mbaya Diagne

The United World College Mostar Endowment ‘Bridge to the Future’ is proud to announce the Captain Mbaye Diagne Scholarship. This scholarship will provide a free place for a student from either Rwanda or Senegal at United World College (UWC) Mostar in perpetuity. In the midst of the Rwandan genocide, Captain Mbaye Diagne’s heroic actions saved the lives of many people, yet ultimately led to his own demise.

Having a Captain Mbaye Diagne scholar in the post-conflict society of Bosnia and Herzegovina will be a powerful way to honour one of the heroes of the 20th century. Captain Diagne’s experiences of ethnic cleansing in Rwanda show the importance of fostering peace and ethnic reconciliation, both of which are at the heart of UWC Mostar’s mission. The trustees of the College hope that his courage, altruistic nature and determination will inspire the students of UWC Mostar as well as people from all over the world.

Commenting on the creation of the scholarship, the widow of Captain Mbaye Diagne, Ms Yacine Diagne, stated: “I am very honoured and proud at the creation of a scholarship in the name of my late husband. This must open our eyes and show us the way towards solidarity and towards love for our fellow human beings, for our country and our planet as the way to achieve any success. May the Lord assist us in all these endeavours and may the door of happiness be open to all of us. Such a great honour really touches our hearts as members of Captain Mbaye Diagne’s family: this is why our children and I are very grateful to the UWC; and indeed, the decision of the Mostar Endowment is a reason of pride for the Senegalese.

Biography of Captain Mbaye Diagne
Born in Coki, Senegal, in 1958, Captain Mbaye Diagne was an exemplary UN peacekeeper who, confronted with the horrors of the genocide in Rwanda and the inaction of the international community, risked his life in order to rescue as many people as possible from torture and death.

After studying at the University of Dakar, Mbaye Diagne joined the Senegalese army, which, in 1993, send him to Rwanda as a military observer. When, on 7 April 1994, the war in Rwanda broke out, the Captain saved the Rwandan Prime Minister’s children from the hands of the army. Following this, even though the UN rules of engagement prohibited observers from going out to save civilians, Captain Diagne continued to rescue many more of those in danger, with numbers often estimated at hundreds. His efforts ended very suddenly on 31 May 1994 when, twelve days before the end of his mission, Captain Diagne was killed by a mortal shell.

Captain Mbaye Diagne’s heroic sacrifice was officially recognised by the Government of Rwanda in 2010, by the then US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton in 2011, and, in the same year, by the Garden of the Righteous Worldwide of the city of Padua, Italy. On 6 April 2014, the BBC aired Mark Doyle’s documentary “A good man in Rwanda”, dedicated to Captain Mbaye Diagne. After watching the documentary, Prince Zeid Ra’ad Zeid al-Hussein, then the Ambassador of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan to the UN in New York, declared before the Security Council that Captain Mbaye Diagne is "the greatest hero of the United Nations". On 8 May 2014, the Security Council unanimously adopted the Prince’s resolution to recognise the Captain’s heroism, creating the “Captain Mbaye Diagne Medal for Exceptional Courage”. This medal will be awarded to military, police and civilian United Nations or associated personnel who distinguish themselves by protecting lives under dangerous circumstances.

In 2010, the Captain’s widow, Ms. Yacine Diagne, and the children Coumba and Cheikh, together with a group of friends and admirers of the Captain set up the Association of Captain Mbaye Diagne for the Culture of Peace. This association has the objective of promoting Captain Diagne’s memory and of fostering a culture of peace in Senegal and in the world (see www.acmdpeace.org). On 31 May 2014, the Association partnered with the Regional Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights in Dakar to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the Captain’s death.
The Aung San Suu Kyi Scholarship
Opposition leader, Burma
It is essential for us to rebuild the Burmese education system that was destroyed by decades of mismanagement. We must encourage young Burmese to take opportunities to study abroad, so they might bring back skills and experiences that will support the democratic reconstruction of our country. Burma is rich in human potential. It is only through education that our young people will be able to develop as able and responsible citizens who will ensure the future of our society. It is therefore with great pleasure that I have accepted the invitation of the United World Colleges to endow a scholarship in my name for a young Burmese at their Mostar College. I thank the donors for their generosity towards the people of Burma. Your gift will enable a young person to gain not just an academic qualification but what is denied to so many young people in Burma today, the capacity to meet the challenges that our country is facing. The United World Colleges offer an enlightened education that is directed, as the United Nations Declaration on Human Rights envisions, towards understanding, tolerance and friendship among all nations. That is the greatest contribution any institution can make towards the happiness of humanity.
Aung San Suu Kyi

The United World College Mostar Endowment ‘Bridge to the Future’ is proud to present the Aung San Suu Kyi Scholarship. This scholarship funds a place for a Burmese student at United World College (UWC) Mostar in perpetuity. The trustees of the endowment are honoured to have the support of such an inspirational figure who has, despite difficult circumstances, continued to support the ideals of freedom and democracy in the face of a totalitarian regime. Her continuous promotion of human rights, tolerance and international understanding, as well as her emphasis on the importance of education, fits closely with the mission of the UWC movement as a whole and UWC Mostar in particular.

In a reaction to the creation of the scholarship, Aung San Suu Kyi said: “It is essential for us to rebuild the Burmese education system that was destroyed by decades of mismanagement. We must encourage young Burmese to take opportunities to study abroad, so they might bring back skills and experiences that will support the democratic reconstruction of our country.

Burma is rich in human potential. It is only through education that our young people will be able to develop as able and responsible citizens who will ensure the future of our society. It is therefore with great pleasure that I have accepted the invitation of the United World Colleges to endow a scholarship in my name for a young Burmese at their Mostar College. I thank the donors for their generosity towards the people of Burma.

Your gift will enable a young person to gain not just an academic qualification but what is denied to so many young people in Burma today, the capacity to meet the challenges that our country is facing. The United World Colleges offer an enlightened education that is directed, as the United Nations Declaration on Human Rights envisions, towards understanding, tolerance and friendship among all nations. That is the greatest contribution any institution can make towards the happiness of humanity.”


Biography Aung San Suu Kyi
Aung San Suu Kyi was born the 19th of June 1945 in Rangoon (now Yangon). Her father, Aung San, was a one of the founders of the modern Burmese army and a leading figure in the Burmese struggle for independence. After the assassination of Aung San in 1947, Suu Kyi’s mother, Khin Kyi, became a prominent figure in Burmese politics, most notably as minister of social welfare.

Following a period of living abroad, amongst other places in Oxford where she gained a bachelor degree in Philosophy, Politics and Economics, Aung San Suu Kyi returned to Burma in 1988 to take care of her ill mother. When she arrived, Suu Kyi found her country in the midst of a democratic uprising. She joined the newly formed National League for Democracy (NLD), where she took an active role in opposing the regime, ultimately leading to her detainment.

A long period of being in and out of house arrest followed. Throughout this time, however, Suu Kyi never let go of her ideals of a free and democratic Burma, gaining more and more prominence as leader of the Burmese opposition in the struggle for democracy. Recently, Suu Kyi’s efforts have had significant positive results, with the NLD being able to successfully stand for elections in 2012. During these elections Suu Kyi was elected to the country’s parliament.
Aung San Suu Kyi’s persistence and strength were rewarded most notably with a Nobel Peace Prize in 1991, but also with the International Simon Bolivar Prize in 1992 and the US Congressional Gold Medal in 2008. In 2012 she received the Vaclav Havel Prize for Creative Dissent.
The Nelson Mandela Fellowship
Former president of South Africa and former honorary president of UWC
We are truly thrilled to receive and to endorse this important fellowship which will enable South Africa to be permanently represented in the United World College in Mostar. Nelson Mandela’s support of the international education and leadership offered by the United World Colleges is a matter of public record. The generosity of the UWC Mostar endowment trustees is a gesture that will keep alive in a really convincing and personal way the memory of his enthusiasm and support for the UWC. It reflects his highest beliefs.
Nelson Mandela Foundation

The United World College Mostar Endowment ‘Bridge to the Future’ is proud to present the Nelson Mandela Fellowship. This fellowship sponsors a place for a South African student at United World College (UWC) Mostar in perpetuity. The endowment trustees believe that the presence of a Nelson Mandela fellow in the post-conflict environment of Mostar will be a powerful and living expression of the ideals by which Nelson Mandela lived his life.

Commenting on the creation of the fellowship, the Nelson Mandela Foundation stated to be “truly thrilled to receive and to endorse this important fellowship which will enable South Africa to be permanently represented in the United World College in Mostar. Nelson Mandela’s support of the international education and leadership offered by the United World Colleges is a matter of public record. The generosity of the UWC Mostar endowment trustees is a gesture that will keep alive in a really convincing and personal way the memory of his enthusiasm and support for the UWC. It reflects his highest beliefs.”

Nelson Mandela and the United World Colleges
Nelson Mandela has had a close connection with the United World Colleges ever since he sent his daughters Zindziswa and Zenani to attend the UWC Waterford Kamhlaba School in Swaziland. Other prominent opponents of apartheid also entrusted their children to this school, including his later wife Graça Machel, thereby bearing powerful witness to the vision and courage of the school’s founders.

Mandela’s relationship with UWC strengthened further when, following the terms of first Lord Mountbatten and then Prince Charles, Mandela accepted the Presidency of the International Council meeting in Johannesburg in November 1995, whilst HM Queen Noor of Jordan assumed the Presidency of the movement itself. After the Council meeting, Nelson Mandela became the movement’s Honorary President until his death.

All who were present in Johannesburg will remember the inspiration Nelson Mandela brought to the day-long meeting, his personal engagement with every individual, his attendance until late into the evening at the dinner and students’ show, and his presentation of the first Founder’s Awards to distinguished members of the UWC. His words, spoken that day, have continued to resound throughout the UWC movement:

“For many of us, Waterford was an island of non-racialism in the sea of apartheid. That is the virtue and the strength of the UWC – it provides small but powerful cells of innovation, catalysts for change, breaking barriers of habit and opening up broader vistas of experience for both pupils and educationalists.”
The Prince El Hassan bin Talal and Princess Sarvath El Hassan Scholarship
Jordan
We are honoured at UWC Mostar's decision to announce a scholarship in our name. The College’s mission to contribute to the construction of post-conflict societies is both noble and important. We hope that graduates of both the College and our scholarship go on to help heal divided societies in meaningful and lasting ways. We are delighted to be part of this wonderful opportunity that will ultimately help people around the world come to terms with their past, and move together into a brighter future.
Prince El Hassan bin Talal and Princess Sarvath El Hassan

The United World College Mostar Endowment ‘Bridge to the Future’ is proud to present The Prince El Hassan bin Talal and Princess Sarvath El Hassan Scholarship. This scholarship provides a place for a student from Jordan at United World College (UWC) Mostar in perpetuity. The trustees of the endowment are honoured to have these two very important and praiseworthy people backing the endowment initiative. Their continuous involvement with matters of social welfare, human rights, education and the promotion of inter-faith dialogue closely aligns with the mission and ideals of UWC in general and UWC Mostar in particular.

Commenting on the creation of the scholarship, Their Royal Highnesses state: “We are honoured at UWC Mostar's decision to announce a scholarship in our name. The College’s mission to contribute to the construction of post-conflict societies is both noble and important. We hope that graduates of both the College and our scholarship go on to help heal divided societies in meaningful and lasting ways. We are delighted to be part of this wonderful opportunity that will ultimately help people around the world come to terms with their past, and move together into a brighter future.”

Biography HRH Prince El Hassan bin Talal

Born in 1947 to a branch of the Hashemite family directly descended from the Prophet Muhammad (PBUH), in the forty-second generation of descendants, HRH Prince Hassan is the brother of His late Majesty King Hussein and uncle of HM King Abdullah II of Jordan.

A pluralist and staunch campaigner for the rights of all to live in peace and dignity, HRH established the Arab Thought Forum, the Royal Institute for Interfaith Studies, the Higher Council for Science and Technology and the Regional Security Centre in Jordan. Prince Hassan’s international commitments have included co-chairing the Independent Commission on International Humanitarian Issues, serving as Commissioner on Legal Empowerment of the Poor and launching the West Asia-North Africa Forum (WANA).
A pioneer of interfaith dialogue and understanding, Prince Hassan initiated and hosted on-going consultations with the Orthodox Centre of the Ecumenical Patriarchate at Chambesy, Switzerland and the Pontifical Council for Inter-religious Dialogue at the Vatican. Prince Hassan is co-founder and Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Foundation for Inter-religious and Intercultural Research and Dialogue (FIIRD). Now President Emeritus, Prince Hassan was Moderator of the World Conference of Religions for Peace (WCRP) from 1999-2006.

Prince Hassan has long had an active engagement with environmentally focused organisations, in particular the Trans-Mediterranean Renewable Energy Cooperation (TREC) Network, and the Jordan based Badia Research and Development Program. Prince Hassan recently served as the Chairman of the UN Secretary-General’s Advisory Board on Water and Sanitation, UNSGAB and continues to work on water related issues as the Chairman of the High Level Forum for the Blue Peace Middle East plan.

Biography HRH Princess Sarvath El Hassan
Her Royal Highness was born in Calcutta on the 24 July, 1947 to a prominent family of the Indian subcontinent. HRH Crown Prince El Hassan bin Talal and Princess Sarvath married in Karachi on the 28th of August 1968.
Princess Sarvath has served Jordan for over 40 years. HRH initiated, sponsored, and continues to support projects and activities in Jordan, mainly in the field of education, in addition to issues pertaining to women and the family, social welfare and health and educational projects for those with learning disabilities.
HRH founded the Amman Baccalaureate School in 1981 and continues to Chair its Board of Trustees. This independent, non-profit, co-educational school provides students with an education of the highest international standards, while remaining firmly rooted in Arab Islamic heritage and culture. Many programmes developed within the school such as the El Hassan Youth Award have been adopted nationally and developed by the school. Complementing this work, HRH also served on the Council of Foundation of the International Baccalaureate Organization for many years.

HRH established the Jordanian United World Colleges National Selection Committee, and chaired the committee for fourteen years until September 1995. Princess Sarvath actively supports the participation of young Jordanians in creative exchange programmes.
The Paul A. Volcker Scholarship
Former President of the Federal Reserve, United States
I am honored to accept the invitation of the United World College in Mostar to have a student scholarship endowed in my name. The students of UWC Mostar are fortunate to have such generous donors committed to supporting their education at this unique institution. In today’s turbulent times, the importance of the mission of UWC Mostar – facilitating dialogue and learning among young students from different backgrounds and countries – rings especially true. One of the lessons of economics is prosperity can be maintained only in the context of international coordination and collaboration. In more peaceful days, I long ago visited Mostar. I was struck by its old world charm, but also by the continuing frictions and lack of full trust among the different social and religious groups. UWC Mostar and its “lighthouse” model of education reform are looking toward a new promise for this place and its people, and to extend the message to other regions of this disturbed world. I urge the recipients of scholarships at UWC Mostar, as they continue their education and contemplate their future, to live out the ideals set forth by the College in their personal and professional lives. I also humbly suggest that some students may wish to consider public service as one path to contribute to a more harmonious, prosperous world. After more than 30 years in the federal government of the United States, I can assure these students that there can be a sense of satisfaction in devoting one’s energies and talents to the public good beyond any material reward.
Paul Volcker

The United World College Mostar Endowment ‘Bridge to the Future’ is proud to present the Paul A. Volcker Scholarship. This scholarship finances a place for a bright young student interested in economics at United World College (UWC) Mostar in perpetuity.

The trustees of the endowment are honoured to have such an important figure supporting the endowment initiative. Throughout his life, Volcker has been of tremendous importance for the global economic order. For example, he helped to shape the post-Bretton Woods financial system and ended the period of stagflation in the United States in the late 1970s. He has also been one of the main advisors to reduce the global systemic risk of the financial sector during 2008 and 2009. Through the creation of this scholarship, the trustees of the endowment hope to secure the long-term financial stability of the College whilst giving a talented student the chance to study in an inspiring and transformative environment.

Commenting on the creation of the Paul A. Volcker Scholarship, Volcker states:
I am honored to accept the invitation of the United World College in Mostar to have a student scholarship endowed in my name. The students of UWC Mostar are fortunate to have such generous donors committed to supporting their education at this unique institution.

In today’s turbulent times, the importance of the mission of UWC Mostar – facilitating dialogue and learning among young students from different backgrounds and countries – rings especially true. One of the lessons of economics is prosperity can be maintained only in the context of international coordination and collaboration.

In more peaceful days, I long ago visited Mostar. I was struck by its old world charm, but also by the continuing frictions and lack of full trust among the different social and religious groups. UWC Mostar and its “lighthouse” model of education reform are looking toward a new promise for this place and its people, and to extend the message to other regions of this disturbed world.

I urge the recipients of scholarships at UWC Mostar, as they continue their education and contemplate their future, to live out the ideals set forth by the College in their personal and professional lives. I also humbly suggest that some students may wish to consider public service as one path to contribute to a more harmonious, prosperous world. After more than 30 years in the federal government of the United States, I can assure these students that there can be a sense of satisfaction in devoting one’s energies and talents to the public good beyond any material reward.


Biography Paul Volcker
Paul A. Volcker worked in the United States Federal Government for almost 30 years, culminating in two terms as Chairman of the Federal Reserve from 1979-1987. Following this, he served for ten years as Chairman of Wolfensohn & Co., a prominent New York investment bank, as well as being Professor Emeritus of International Economic Policy at Princeton. From 1996-1999, Volcker was Chairman of a committee to determine existing dormant accounts and other assets in Swiss banks of victims of Nazi persecution.

From 2000-2005, Volcker served as Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the International Accounting Standards Committee. In April 2004, he was asked by UN Secretary General Kofi Annan to chair an inquiry into the United Nations Oil-for-Food Program. In 2007, he was asked by the President of the World Bank to chair a panel of experts to review the operations of the Bank’s Department of Institutional Integrity. From November 2008 to 2011, he served as Chairman of the President’s Economic Recovery Advisory Board. Educated at Princeton, Harvard and the London School of Economics, Mr. Volcker launched the Volcker Alliance in 2013 to address the challenge of effective execution of public policies and to help rebuild trust in government.
The Elisabeth and David Sutcliffe Scholarship
Former teacher and headmaster UWC Atlanic and UWC Adriatic, founder of UWC Mostar
The creation of an endowed scholarship in our joint names for UWC Mostar is a huge excitement for us. The College, with all its associated activities, has dominated the years of our retirement since 2001. The memories of the 1990s, when our close physical proximity to the terrible events just across the border with the former Yugoslavia brought home to us our helplessness in doing anything effective about them, have been the main force in our work for the Mostar College. We know just how much energy, enthusiasm, thought and generosity have been necessary to launch the endowment fund. Without it the College assuredly has no future. We are immensely grateful and immensely proud.
Elisabeth and David Sutcliffe

The United World College Mostar Endowment ‘Bridge to the Future’ is proud to present the Elisabeth and David Sutcliffe Scholarship. This scholarship funds a place for a student from Bosnia and Herzegovina at United World College (UWC) Mostar in perpetuity. The trustees of the endowment are honoured to have the support from two of the most important figures in the history of UWC and one of the founders of UWC Mostar.

Commenting on the creation of the scholarship, David and Elisabeth state: “The creation of an endowed scholarship in our joint names for UWC Mostar is a huge excitement for us. The College, with all its associated activities, has dominated the years of our retirement since 2001. The memories of the 1990s, when our close physical proximity to the terrible events just across the border with the former Yugoslavia brought home to us our helplessness in doing anything effective about them, have been the main force in our work for the Mostar College. We know just how much energy, enthusiasm, thought and generosity have been necessary to launch the endowment fund. Without it the College assuredly has no future. We are immensely grateful and immensely proud.”

Biographies Elisabeth and David Sutcliffe
Elisabeth and David Sutcliffe became involved with UWC a year before the opening of its first college, UWC of the Atlantic, when David was appointed to the college staff in order to assist with the preparations. This followed a period of increasingly close contact with Kurt Hahn, the founder of UWC of the Atlantic, whom David came to know well whilst teaching at Hahn’s first school ‘Salem’ in South Germany from 1956-1960. For a brief period in 1960, David served as Hahn’s private secretary, a time during which the momentum for the purchase of the St. Donat’s Castle, the campus of Atlantic College, gathered pace.

Starting as housemaster and teacher of French and German, David advanced to Director of Studies and Deputy Head in 1967 and then to the post of College Head in 1969. During David’s headship, Atlantic College became the first school in the world to adopt the IB Diploma for all students. In 1982 the Sutcliffes moved to Italy to take part in the establishment of the Adriatic College, where David was the Rettore from 1982 until 2001. Following retirement that year he, Tony Besse and the Finnish Adriatic graduate Pilvi Torsti joined forces to create, in laborious stages, UWC Mostar. David was Vice-President of the International Baccalaureate Council of Foundation from 1985-1989 and Executive Director of United World Colleges International from 1994-1999.

In addition to her heavy hospitality commitments with official visitors, Elisabeth taught part-time in both Atlantic and Adriatic College, Latin and English at the former and English at the latter. Her involvement at the Adriatic College included tutoring, social service and, in the final years, the College graduate network.
The Antonin Besse Scholarship
Entrepreneur in Yemen and lifelong supporter of UWC
I am moved to have a scholarship at UWC Mostar endowed in my name. I am deeply grateful to the donors who have made this gesture. UWC Mostar has been the final chapter in my long involvement in the United World Colleges. The problems we faced in the early days brought back vividly to my mind all the challenges faced by the founders of Atlantic College back in the 1960s. In Mostar, I feel we have a college on the true front line of international education. The road running past the front of the Gymnasium building was indeed the front line in those terrible events in Mostar in the 1990s. I feel that my father with St. Antony’s College in Oxford and I with the United World Colleges have been enormously privileged to make a contribution to international understanding. The UWC Mostar endowment campaign gives me the confidence that this work of mine and of my close colleagues now has a long-term future.
Antonin Besse

The United World College Mostar Endowment ‘Bridge to the Future’ is proud to present the Antonin Besse Scholarship. This scholarship funds a place for a student from either Bosnia and Herzegovina or Yemen at United World College (UWC) Mostar in perpetuity. The Antonin Besse Scholarship honours one of UWC’s founding figures and does justice to Besse’s life-long involvement with the UWC movement. Antonin Besse was instrumental to the founding of the UWC movement by donating the St. Donat’s Castle, which became the campus of UWC’s first school, UWC of the Atlantic. He was also a key member of the small team that created UWC Mostar.

Commenting on the scholarship, Besse states: “I am moved to have a scholarship at UWC Mostar endowed in my name. I am deeply grateful to the donors who have made this gesture. UWC Mostar has been the final chapter in my long involvement in the United World Colleges. The problems we faced in the early days brought back vividly to my mind all the challenges faced by the founders of Atlantic College back in the 1960s. In Mostar, I feel we have a college on the true front line of international education. The road running past the front of the Gymnasium building was indeed the front line in those terrible events in Mostar in the 1990s. I feel that my father with St. Antony’s College in Oxford and I with the United World Colleges have been enormously privileged to make a contribution to international understanding. The UWC Mostar endowment campaign gives me the confidence that this work of mine and of my close colleagues now has a long-term future.”

Biography Antonin Besse
Born in the south of France (Cavalaire) in 1927, Antonin Besse was educated in the French Lycée of Toulon. Whilst still a schoolboy he became an active member of the French resistance, running errands, assuming the right to miss school, challenging the Headmaster, a Vichy man, at assembly, and being expelled. Later, he took over his father’s business, no easy inheritance: his father was a legend in the Middle East, immortalised in the writings of Evelyn Waugh and Freya Stark.

The war over, his father (also Antonin), being an enthusiastic Anglophone, put up the funds to launch St. Antony’s College in Oxford. By this time he had met Kurt Hahn, the founder of UWC of the Atlantic, whose educational ideas he shared passionately. His donation in 1950 saved Hahn’s Gordonstoun school from bankruptcy. On his father’s death in 1951, Antonin, better known in UWC circles as Tony, took up his father’s role and, on the back of a steadily increasing friendship with Kurt Hahn and admiration for his achievements, funded the purchase of the St. Donat’s Castle and estate in October 1960 which made the whole UWC adventure possible. It is not too much to state that, in two successive generations, the Besse family funded and made possible two of the most exciting and influential post-war ventures in university and late secondary education.

Tony has remained heavily engaged in UWC affairs ever since, serving as the first Chairman of the newly founded International Board under Lord Mountbatten’s Presidency, assisting the French National Committee, acting on behalf of the International Board in the establishment of the UWC Adriatic in 1982, and becoming a key member of the small team that created UWC Mostar in 2006. In more recent years, remaining faithful to his family’s life in the Middle East, he has devoted himself to the recruitment and selection of students from Yemen, returning repeatedly to the country in difficult and often dangerous circumstances.